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Acadia national park

Images of Acadia on Instagram

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Images of Acadia on Instagram

My top nine Instagram images of 2018.

My top nine Instagram images of 2018.

I joined Instagram just over a year ago, thinking I’d give the photo-based social media site a shot and see if there was any interest in my work. It’s taken me a few months to figure out how it all works and build a small following, but just before Christmas, things blew up… and my images are regularly attracting 2-3,000+ likes, with more followers joining me every day. I don’t understand why, but it’s been very gratifying to read the comments and see how my images are inspiring photographers and others around the world.

Instagram has become the easiest way for me to regularly post my photos of Acadia. I still post to the Images of Acadia Facebook page, but if you want to see new pictures every two or three days, follow me on Instagram @imagesofacadia.

When I posted this image of a sunrise on Cadillac Mountain on my other Instagram page, @mikehudsonseye, it quickly became my most popular image on the internet- ever.

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The Photographer's Guide to Acadia

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The Photographer's Guide to Acadia

I first published the Photographer's Guide to Acadia in 2014. Over the years, I've been keeping notes about places in Acadia that photograph really well. Some locations are better photographed in the early morning, others in the afternoon, and some are best seen while the sun is going down. It took me years of visiting these locations again and again, at all times of the day, to realize this.

I found some places in books or on postcards. I asked locals and other photographers for suggestions. I pored over maps to discover where the light might be extra special at a certain vantage point. Some locations were great and I came away with beautiful photos. Other places sounded good, but photographically, I came away with nothing. But all the while, I kept making mental notes about where the best places were.

Sunrise at Hunters Head, Acadia National Park, Maine, USA

Eventually after eight years of exploring Acadia this way, I sat down one winter to write a book where I could share my extensive knowledge of Acadia with other photographers– so that they could spend their time in the park well, not searching fruitlessly with nothing to show for their labors. OK now... I'm all about wandering through the landscape with no agenda, observing purely for the sake of enjoying nature. But I also know most visitors have little time to wander aimlessly. They want to leave with iconic images, beautiful prints that they can hang on their walls or show friends.

Fog and boulders around Jordan Pond, Acadia National Park, Maine

The new, second edition of the Photographer's Guide to Acadia gives you my Top Ten suggestions of places to see and photograph in Acadia. But I also tell you when to visit them- the best time of day– and how to photograph them. I share with you the camera settings I used, what kind of lens is best in any given location, and any other extra gear I used, and what filters might be appropriate. I also talk about how to use your camera more effectively, and how to creatively use aperture and shutter speed to be more artistic in your photography.

Evening light on Bubble Pond, Acadia National Park, Maine, USA

Best of all, every photo in the book is tagged with a link to Google Maps, so that you only have to touch a photo on your screen and you'll be taken to the exact location where I made the photo, and be given directions how to get there. You can't do that with a printed book; only an ebook has this advantage!

Autumn Foliage, Northeast Creek, Mount Desert Island, Maine, USA

If Under October Skies is my ultimate book of fine art landscape photography in Acadia, the Photographer's Guide to Acadia is the book that gives away all my secrets. You'll read how I made many of the images, the gear I used and what I was thinking when I made the photo. If you're planning to visit Acadia National Park this year, download your copy of the book and start planning your trip now. It's only $12.99.

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Color or Black and White?

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Color or Black and White?

Newport Cove, Ocean Drive, 6:57am

Newport Cove, Ocean Drive, 6:57am

I always get out of bed early when I'm in Acadia, with the eternal hope that there'll be a stunning sunrise with the sky lighting up in a brilliant show of fiery reds and oranges over a beautiful Acadian landscape. Unfortunately it doesn't always happen that way. Often, the sun remains hidden behind a veil of clouds and at the appointed time, all you see is dull, heavy cloud cover.

This was one of those days. But fortunately, there was a misty fog this morning and as the weak sun tried in vain to pierce the gloom, I knew there would be no good color to photograph that day. So instead, I decided to think in monochrome.

The image here is all about the line of the coast, and the weak sun straining to cut through the fog. When color is an integral part of your image, photograph in color. But often a photo is more about shapes, textures and form, and color might only distract from your image. When doing landscape photography, ask yourself if color is important to the image. If not, think in black and white and pay more attention to contrast, and the subtle differences between light and dark.

Of course, if you're using a digital camera, you're already shooting in color (hopefully your camera is set to shoot in raw), and you'd plan to convert the image to black and white back home anyway. But I find if I think in black and white while I'm shooting, I tend to think more in terms of contrast, and shades of gray. Always have your end product in mind while you're shooting.

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Opal Magazine Feature

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Opal Magazine Feature

“I’m looking at colors and the way the light plays on the landscape and using my camera to paint an image. I’m always trying to move beyond a snapshot, beyond the big, grand vistas, beyond recording just what I see in front of me.”

Back in June 2017, I had just driven 1300 miles to Bar Harbor, where I was going to show my work at the annual Art in the Park art fair, then doing some hotel photography afterwards. Literally, within a couple minutes of walking in the door of my hotel room, I received an email from the publisher of Opal Magazine, who wanted to do a feature on my photography for an upcoming issue. A couple weeks later, a writer called to interview me and the story was underway.

Opal is a high end publication for luxury hotels along the East coast, from Maine down to Florida. The coffee table magazine will be placed in every room at two of Bar Harbor's premier luxury hotels, the West Street Hotel and the Harborside Hotel, when they open this Spring.

It was a long wait, but I've just received my copies of the magazine and it looks great. They've published a nine page spread of my Abstract Acadia images, where, among other things, I use camera movement, fast and slow shutter speeds and multiple exposures to create more artistic interpretations of the landscape. The images chosen are pretty different from the usual pictures you see of Acadia, but I'm proud of the the fact that they wanted to feature these more creative images. You can see some of the images they chose below, or visit the full gallery on my website here.

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